How Sound Therapy Helped my Anxiety

At the age of 15 I started to feel things I had never experienced before. Random fear crept into my life. I was no longer able to control how fast my thoughts were running. My chest would become tight and I thought I was dying. I experienced my first panic attack while performing a dance routine in front of thousands of people. I had no idea what was going on. I was denying myself.

Fast forward five years and I had been able to manage my anxiety. I was on a low dose of anxiety medication, I went through traditional therapy and I learned coping mechanisms. There were periods in my life where I didn’t even experience anxiety. I traveled to different parts of the world without anxiety even on my mind. But I felt numb. I was always tired and this was affecting different aspects of my life.

I decided I needed a serious change in my life. The thought of being on medication for the rest of my life was a terrifying thought. But every single time I tried getting off of the medication my anxiety was unbearable. I was struck with random panic attacks, I couldn’t sit still and I was not enjoying my life.

I found sound therapy through one of my close friends. I noticed a difference immediately. We uncovered underlying issues that I was never able to understand before this process. After a few sessions I decided that I was ready to try to get off my medication for real this time.

The first thing I did was go to my doctor and tell her that I was interested in getting off of my medication. I let my family and friends know so I was able to have their support during this very difficult time. I scheduled sound therapy appointments once a week so I could handle some of the withdrawals and different side effects I was feeling.

There were moments where I honestly thought I could not do it. I had been taking medication for about four years and I almost forgot how to use my coping mechanisms. Bonnie treated me for anxiety, panic and other environmental factors. There were days where I didn’t want to leave my bed or go anywhere because I knew I was just going to be anxious. But I will never let my anxiety stop me from doing anything. Once I let my fears affect my life; that is the moment I give them the power and I lose control and I will never allow that to happen.

So what did I do when I had those horrible days? I went for a run. I tried meditating. I started doing yoga. I read a book. I would write about how I was feeling. I would write about completely irrelevant things. I would call up my friends and we would go do something fun. I started photography. I would do anything to benefit myself and take my mind off of it. If there is one thing I could tell anyone trying to get off of their medication it would be this- Keep pushing forward, every day is a day closer to feeling better. Never lose hope and always find the good in each situation.

You don’t have to live with anxiety. I believe that it is a temporary thing someone goes through. The key is to not give your anxiety enough power to overtake your life. That is when it becomes a problem. I am at fault for doing this. I always gave my anxiety too much power. But with the help of sound therapy I was able to face my anxiety head on and finally find comfort in it. I’ll admit, it did take me a good two months before I finally started to feel okay getting off my medication. There are some days where I still feel anxious, but those days are getting farther and fewer in between. Sound therapy gives me the strength to eliminate the problems I don’t want in my life.

So if you ever think that you can’t get off of your medication, believe me you probably can. If I can, a 19-year-old college student who has been on medication for four years of my life and deal with a plethora of different stresses everyday, you can do it too. So my question to you is; are you ready to rediscover yourself? Do you have the courage to dig deep and face your anxieties?

*Please consult your doctor before getting off any medication.

Discover Yourself

Tuesday July 28th

Tuesday July 28th we will be at Joannes Stadium for The Green Bay Bullfrogs Game! We will have a table set up with more information about what Rediscover Yourself Sound Therapy is and how it can affect your life. Please stop by and see us and take in a ball game!

We will be there at 5 and the game starts at 7:05

Hope to see you there, put your business card in for the chance to win a FREE treatment. A $60.00 value

Thank you

Steve & Bonnie

Rediscover Yourself

Please take a moment to watch this video and leave us a comment on your thoughts.

10 Weird Ways Your Body Reacts To Stress

Your brain short-circuits

High stress situations—you know, like that work presentation tomorrow—can trigger the release of adrenaline and other fight-or-flight hormones. While those chemicals heighten your brain’s alertness and threat-detection centers (which can be good), they temporarily kneecap your noodle’s cortical networks, which are responsible for contemplation, critical thinking and planning, explains Erno Hermans, Ph.D., of Radboud University in the Netherlands. That happens because your body is conserving energy for a physical confrontation (which, hopefully, won’t occur), Hermans adds. The result: You struggle to find the right words, and you look like a nervous nelly in front of your boss and colleagues.

You suddenly have to excuse yourself

Stress triggers the release of another fight-or-flight chemical known as corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) that messes with your intestinal function, shows a study from the Digestive Diseases Research Center in Los Angeles. Just as animals dump waste during a confrontation, your fight-or-flight response may be helping you jettison excess weight in case you need to flee. Consequently, some people under intense pressure develop diarrhea, the study indicates.

You break out

Elevated levels of the stress hormone cortisol tell your skin’s sebaceous glands, which secrete an anti-inflammatory waxy oil, to kick into overdrive, leading to temporary bursts of acne, flushing, eczema or other weekend-ruining skin conditions, explains Flor A. Mayoral, M.D., a dermatologist at the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine.

You can’t quite kick that cold

When you catch a virus, all the nasty symptoms you experience (like a runny nose, a cough or body aches) are the result of your immune system’s inflammation response to the bug. Stress causes an uptick in your inflammation levels, which means your body reacts more severely to cold viruses, shows a study from Carnegie Mellon University. Your cold symptoms may last longer too, the study suggests.

Your hair falls out

 

Days or weeks of heightened tension can cause you to shed hair like a golden retriever in summer, Mayoral says. That hair loss can last for up to three months after a stressful event or period, though your mane will typically grow back after your stress subsides, she adds. It’s possible that elevated levels of stress-induced inflammation are to blame, research from the American Academy of Dermatology suggests.

 

 

Your brain shrinks

Not to be dramatic, but stress flips off a genetic switch that would normally spur your brain to produce new synapses, which allow your brain cells to communicate with one another, shows research from Yale. As a result, your noggin’s “gray matter” volume falls over time. Gray matter is at least partially involved in your emotion regulation, the study authors say. And there’s evidence linking this type of brain shrinkage with higher rates of depression, they add.

Your nails look funky

While stress hormones can make your nails brittle, Mayoral also sees ugly, raised ridges in the middle of her stressed-out patients’ nails. Why? Like cracking knuckles or chewing the ends of hair, another way people fidget is to press their fingertips down on the edges of their thumbnails. Over time, that can cause an unsightly, lumpy ridge to form in the center of the nail, Mayoral explains.

Your ears ring

One study from Sweden’s Karolinska Institute found the stress of having to change jobs increased ringing and other hearing problems among women by 43 percent. FMRI scans have shown the limbic region of your brain shifts into overdrive when you experience ear ringing, and that part of the brain is also known to handle aspects of stress regulation. The study authors say this limbic activity could explain why tension and hearing issues are connected, though they can’t yet point to a specific mechanism at work.

Your cuts and scrapes just won’t heal

Your body’s stress response draws water away from your skin’s outer layers, possibly as a way to keep you hydrated in an emergency situation, which undermines your skin’s ability to regenerate and repair itself, shows research published in JAMA Dermatology. Compared to their calm cohorts, students who were frazzled from winter midterms showed more redness and irritation on their forearm skin after the (sadistic) researchers slapped on and removed cellophane tape.

Your stomach aches

 

Stress chemicals can mess with your gastrointestinal tract, leading to an angry belly or the urge to vomit, shows research from UCLA. While the ways your brain and gut interact under stress are murky, it’s possible the fight-or-flight chemicals your body releases when you’re frazzled cause your digestive system to hold onto calories and other energy sources, which could explain your cranky stomach, the research suggests.