The Guilt Game

What is guilt? We’ve all felt it. We all know how it makes us feel. It is one of the worst feelings and can leave you sleepless and sad. Maybe you did something and are too embarrassed to admit it. Maybe you finally realized something and feel like you need to right a wrong. Maybe you feel undeserving and when you finally achieve a goal or receive that item, you no longer feel good, but rather guilty.

Guilt is a funny thing. In a cognitive perspective, guilt is the thought that you have done harm unto someone else. Some people feel this emotion many times throughout the day; some people feel this emotion only once in a while. Researchers and psychologists believe that guilt and the amount of guilt you feel is determined on how you were raised and how you played as a child.

Guilt can be irrational and cause extra anxiety. It can make a situation seem more severe than it really was or it can make you question what actually happened. Sometimes people will experience guilt when they come into a large amount of money. Maybe they got a new job and they are paid very well or someone passed away and they inherited money. They may feel like they are undeserving of this money and they are afraid to have it or use it. This can cause extra distress on that person’s life and it can lead to a domino effect of many other problems.

Some people may also feel this way when it comes to love. That person may have been in a poor relationship in the past and believes that they only deserve a partner who will treat them worse than they treat their partner because they feel too much guilt. They feel like they are a burden so they need to be treated like one.

Guilt can form from a lack of confidence or from a lack of deservingness. These emotions could have been formed from situations in the past, it could have been how someone was raised or it could be from depression or anxiety.

So how do we fix it? Someone who experiences an exponential amount of guilt should practice positive affirmations. For example:

“I am deserving of my wealth/life/job/health.”

“Love is attracted to me because I express love.”

“I am happy and deserving.”

“I approve of myself and my surroundings.”

These are just a few examples of what you can tell yourself to boost your confidence and change the way you think. Through sound healing and positive affirmations, someone who experiences a lot of guilt will see improvements and may even notice their outlook change on situations. Nobody has to suffer through guilt. If you or someone you know is experiencing debilitating guilt or an abnormal amount of guilt, suggest sound healing and positive affirmations.

“That Gut Feeling”

Have you ever heard the phrase, “Trust your gut” or “I just had a gut feeling.” Well these phrases are becoming a lot more reputable. According to new research, our Gut Flora (bacteria, fungi and viruses) living in our gut can affect our mental health. There is said to be about six pounds of these flora living in our bodies. An imbalance of these can cause a variation of disorders including anxiety and depression.

Dr. Emeran Mayer from the University of California, Los Angeles believes that the micro flora living in children’s guts influence the developing structures in their brains as they grow up. These structures in their brains then influences their feelings and emotions along with mental health later throughout their life. Through a series of tests that take samples of gut bacteria and correlating them to MRI scans of the brain, there is a strong link to a specific amount/type of bacteria to different disorders.

Infants are exposed to their first gut bacteria from their mothers; however, throughout their early childhood antibiotics, diet, stress or even alcohol consumption may disrupt the bacteria.

So how does the bacteria in our gut communicate with our brains? It communicates directly via the Vagus Nerve that connects them. Research shows that there are more neurons wrapped around the gut than there are in the spinal cord. The bacterium is also able to produce neurochemicals that play a role in how we produce hormones and regulate our moods. Some of these mood hormones include serotonin, dopamine and gamma-amino butyric acid-which play a large role in anxiety and depression.

So your next question is, how do we fix the problem? It’s a smart idea to take probiotics to help foster the good bacteria found in your stomach. It is also a good idea to eat healthy and exercise to increase a healthy digestive system. But another great way is to use Holistic Sound Healing. Sound healing will help tell your body that it does not need to be anxious. By releasing emotions of anxiety and/or depression, it will be easier for your body to heal.

I have personal experience in problems with my stomach correlating to my anxiety. A few years ago I became very ill after a bad bout of food poisoning. My stomach was nowhere near where it needed to be in order to be healthy. I wasn’t able to keep any food in my system long enough to get the proper nutrition and I was unable to gain weight; I was only losing weight. I noticed that when my stomach would act up, so would my anxiety. It took about two years until my stomach started to finally kick the bad bacteria and produce more of the good bacteria. Sound Healing helped subside my anxiety and allow me to not worry about my stomach problems. This was a huge help because eventually my anxiety had created worse stomach problems. It is a vicious cycle that needs to be broken. This is why I encourage Sound Healing to help with stomach problems linked with anxiety and depression. Also, talk to your doctor about a probiotic that works well for you. For more information about gut bacteria being linked to your emotions, follow the link below.

http://www.healthygutbugs.com/probiotics-next-big-anti-anxiety-remedy/ria

How Sound Therapy Helped my Anxiety

At the age of 15 I started to feel things I had never experienced before. Random fear crept into my life. I was no longer able to control how fast my thoughts were running. My chest would become tight and I thought I was dying. I experienced my first panic attack while performing a dance routine in front of thousands of people. I had no idea what was going on. I was denying myself.

Fast forward five years and I had been able to manage my anxiety. I was on a low dose of anxiety medication, I went through traditional therapy and I learned coping mechanisms. There were periods in my life where I didn’t even experience anxiety. I traveled to different parts of the world without anxiety even on my mind. But I felt numb. I was always tired and this was affecting different aspects of my life.

I decided I needed a serious change in my life. The thought of being on medication for the rest of my life was a terrifying thought. But every single time I tried getting off of the medication my anxiety was unbearable. I was struck with random panic attacks, I couldn’t sit still and I was not enjoying my life.

I found sound therapy through one of my close friends. I noticed a difference immediately. We uncovered underlying issues that I was never able to understand before this process. After a few sessions I decided that I was ready to try to get off my medication for real this time.

The first thing I did was go to my doctor and tell her that I was interested in getting off of my medication. I let my family and friends know so I was able to have their support during this very difficult time. I scheduled sound therapy appointments once a week so I could handle some of the withdrawals and different side effects I was feeling.

There were moments where I honestly thought I could not do it. I had been taking medication for about four years and I almost forgot how to use my coping mechanisms. Bonnie treated me for anxiety, panic and other environmental factors. There were days where I didn’t want to leave my bed or go anywhere because I knew I was just going to be anxious. But I will never let my anxiety stop me from doing anything. Once I let my fears affect my life; that is the moment I give them the power and I lose control and I will never allow that to happen.

So what did I do when I had those horrible days? I went for a run. I tried meditating. I started doing yoga. I read a book. I would write about how I was feeling. I would write about completely irrelevant things. I would call up my friends and we would go do something fun. I started photography. I would do anything to benefit myself and take my mind off of it. If there is one thing I could tell anyone trying to get off of their medication it would be this- Keep pushing forward, every day is a day closer to feeling better. Never lose hope and always find the good in each situation.

You don’t have to live with anxiety. I believe that it is a temporary thing someone goes through. The key is to not give your anxiety enough power to overtake your life. That is when it becomes a problem. I am at fault for doing this. I always gave my anxiety too much power. But with the help of sound therapy I was able to face my anxiety head on and finally find comfort in it. I’ll admit, it did take me a good two months before I finally started to feel okay getting off my medication. There are some days where I still feel anxious, but those days are getting farther and fewer in between. Sound therapy gives me the strength to eliminate the problems I don’t want in my life.

So if you ever think that you can’t get off of your medication, believe me you probably can. If I can, a 19-year-old college student who has been on medication for four years of my life and deal with a plethora of different stresses everyday, you can do it too. So my question to you is; are you ready to rediscover yourself? Do you have the courage to dig deep and face your anxieties?

*Please consult your doctor before getting off any medication.